CRIT ENROLLMENT OFFICE

Notice to All CRIT Tribal Members  to Update Addresses

CRIT Tribal members please contact the CRIT Enrollment office to update your mailing addresses as soon as possible. If you have any questions you may direct them to their staff at (928) 669-1240, 1241 or 1304.

 




News for Saturday, February 27, 2021 | More News
 
Tourism Spotlight

Poston Monument
One of our top tourist attractions, the Poston Monument marks the location where more than 17,000 Japanese-Americans were interned during World War II. More...



CRIT Museum
The CRIT Museum is committed to protecting and safeguarding tribal antique collections either stored or displayed and educating tribal members, the community and tourists about the Colorado River Indian tribal history and as a resource for departments, CRIT enterprises and organizations. The Museum houses a gift shop that provides tribal artisans a venue to showcase their wares and crafts to purchase. They also have craft supplies, jewelry, traditional accessories, books and dvds. More...




















Resolution No. 25-21 Extending Resolution No. 54-20 Requiring All Non-Essential Businesses to Close and all  Non-Essential Personnel to Stay at Home From March 1, 2021 Until March 31, 2021
February 26, 2021

Resolution No. 24-21 Extending Resolution No. 54-20 Requiring All Non-Essential Businesses to Close and all Non-Essential Personnel to Stay at Home from February 1, 2021 Until February 28, 2021 (Click for link..)
January 25, 2021

Resolution No. 340-20 Reinstating Resolution No. 54-20 Requiring All Non-Essential Businesses to Close and all Non-Essential Personnel to Stay at Home From December 24, 2020 until January 31, 2021 (Click for link...)

COVID-19 NOTIFICATIONS...

Two (2) New Positive Cases of Coronavirus for the Colorado River Indian Tribes
February 23, 2021 (Updated 2/23/2021)

COVID-19 UPDATES... Click on Link for Updates, Notices, Press Releases and Information





For Immediate Release
January 26, 2021

Contact:
Mike Scerbo
Rose + Moser + Allyn Public and Online Relations
Work: 480.423.1414
Mobile: 602.615.6523

Local Governments, Environmental Groups, Water Users, And Arizona Coalitions Rally In Support Of CRIT’s Right To Lease Water

Colorado River Indian Tribes Poised To Utilize Authority Once Congress Acts

(PARKER, AZ.) New federal legislation that will enable the Colorado River Indian Tribes to lease a portion of its federal water allocation is gaining broad support from Arizona stakeholders.

Following the conclusion of a listening session held by the Arizona Department of Water Resources in December, 2020, interested parties were invited to submit public comment on the proposal. Supportive comments, including those written by CAWCD, SRP, Phoenix and numerous environmental organizations, outnumbered comments in opposition by a margin of 7:1.

CRIT Chairwoman Amelia Flores stated, “These endorsements from such diverse groups make a compelling case to Congress that this bill will provide needed drought relief, affirm CRIT’s sovereignty and create economic opportunities for our region.”

The proposal by CRIT would enable the tribe to lease portions of its federal water allocation that have previously been consumptively used. These leases could help provide Arizona with water for critical environmental projects and needed drought relief while creating significant new economic opportunities for CRIT Tribal members. In 2019, by a margin of more than 60%, CRIT members voted to give the Tribal Council authority to seek enabling federal legislation to lease water. That support now extends well beyond the Tribal borders.

The Water for Arizona Coalition sent a letter of support to the Arizona Department of Water Resources which states in part: “This legislation and its related agreements would remove a critical barrier CRIT faces in fully using its water rights by authorizing CRIT to lease, exchange and store underground a portion of its consumptively used decreed Colorado River water allocation off of its reservation, within the Lower Basin of the State of Arizona.” The Water for Arizona Coalition is chaired by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and supports innovative practices and smart policies to ensure a reliable water supply to meet Arizona’s water needs.

The National Audubon Society also weighed in stating the legislation would provide “exactly the kind of flexibility needed to save the life of the Colorado River.”

Local government supporters include the cities of Phoenix, Gilbert, and Peoria as well as the Mohave County Board of Supervisors. Arizona Municipal Water Users Association, which serves 10 municipalities, says the proposed legislation advances “equity among Arizona water users,” and legislation could “reduce unsustainable groundwater withdrawals.”

The Salt River Project sent a letter of support which said the legislation would, “provide important resources for off-reservation water users while also providing the Tribes with financial resources that are critically needed on the Tribes’ reservation.”

Central Arizona Water Conservation District’s letter of support states the legislation offers, “great promise with many more years of partnership,” and “support opportunities to provide Arizona Tribes with Colorado River decreed water rights greater flexibility to manage their resources.”

CAP General Manager Ted Cooke commented “CAWCD and CRIT have an established relationship working collaboratively on numerous projects over the last five years…This proposed legislation is a significant and historic change for CRIT.”

Support extends beyond correspondence to ADWR.

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) has issued a resolution in support of legislation that permits Tribal governments such as The Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT) to lease water off the reservation. The NCAI resolution states in part: “Water leasing authority presents unique economic development opportunities for tribal nations, while helping local non-Indian communities address critical impacts from ongoing drought conditions.” The NCAI, established in 1944, is the oldest and largest national organization of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments.

Pinal Central, a media outlet that serves Pinal County, published an editorial which states, “This is an idea that is definitely worth exploring...”

If passed and signed into law the proposed federal legislation would allow CRIT to lease a portion of its federally adjudicated water right off its reservation, as numerous other Arizona tribes that have Congressionally enacted water settlements are already permitted to do. 


COLORADO RIVER INDIAN TRIBES
December 24, 2020

Stay At Home Resolution ReInstated Effective Immediately

Resolution No. 24-21 Extending Resolution No. 54-20 Requiring All Non-Essential Businesses to Close and all Non-Essential Personnel to Stay at Home from February 1, 2021 Until February 28, 2021 (Click for link..)
January 25, 2021

Because of a sharp increase in COVID-19 cases on the CRIT Reservation and in an abundance of caution, CRIT Chairman Dennis Patch is reinstating the previously approved "Stay at Home Order" also known as Resolution 54-20. These include:

  • A reservation-wide curfew shall remain in effect for all individuals from 10pm to 5am with the exception of travel for essential work or medical care.

  • All private gatherings, including wakes and funerals, of more than 6 people shall be postponed (excluding members of the same household). In addition, there is no non-essential travel.

  • Recreational activities are suspended. This does not include individuals or family units from walking around their neighborhood, playing outside in their yard, running or biking provided social distancing is practiced. This excludes large groups playing group sports, contact or not.

The requirements of the Stay At Home Order are enforceable by issuance of civil citation with fines from $100 up to $1000 for intentional or repeat violations.

However, tribal enterprises and departments will remain operational with current safety protocols, including continued compliance with the reservation wide Face Mask mandate.

Indeed, the "Safer At Home Resolution" requires Chairman to reinstate the "Stay at Home Order" if there is an 8% or more bi-weekly change of Indian Health Services COVID-19 cases. There has been a 9.1% increase of cases reported as of December 23rd. Indian Health Services has reported 113 cases to date in December alone, which is more than the 100 cases reported August through November combined.

Chairman Patch stated, "The health and safety of the people of CRIT must come first. We cannot take chances with this deadly pandemic. We must all do our part to keep COVID-19 from spreading and these measures are the best way to accomplish that. I realize this comes during the holidays. But it's better to take precautions now so that our family and loved ones will be with us for years to come. Many of our tribal member families are currently ill with COVID-19 and will be recuperating this Christmas and New Year holiday. Our thoughts and prayers are with each one of you for a quick recovery. We know we can turn the tide of this surge in cases if everyone stays at home with immediate family only and avoids all non-essential activities and travel."


Happy New Year

Wishing you the very best for 2021! 

Dear Patrons - 
Due to the increase of Covid-19 in our community and adhering to CRIT Resolution #54-20, the CRIT Library and Archives will remain closed to the public.

We will continue to make our book and DVD’s available for checkout. Instructions can be found on our website.

Our guiding principle through this process will be to provide a safe working environment for library staff and a safe library experience for you.

The library staff will continue to work hard to shift focus to a virtual environment so that we can continue to serve you in some capacity.

We are continuing to answer phone inquiries for those of you who need additional help or have other questions.

Please continue to check our website for updates – as we finalize plans, they will be posted there.

Keep reading and stay safe!



For Immediate Release 11/16/2020

Contact:
Mike Scerbo
Rose + Moser + Allyn Public and Online Relations
Work: 480.423.1414
Mobile: 602.615.6523
Email: mscerbo@rosemoserallynpr.com

CRIT Proposes Landmark Federal Legislation That Will Help Arizona Drought Relief And Provide Economic Opportnities for Tribal Members

(PARKER, AZ.) The Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT) Tribal Council is proposing new federal legislation that would enable CRIT to lease a portion of its federal water allocation to bring about more drought relief for Arizona and economic opportunities for tribal members.

If passed and signed into law, this proposed federal legislation would allow CRIT, like numerous other Arizona tribes, to lease water off its reservation. CRIT is the largest holder of first priority Colorado River Water in Arizona. In 2019, CRIT tribal members approved Protect and Prosper: The CRIT Water Ordinance with nearly two-thirds of the vote, a critical first step towards the introduction of federal legislation. The CRIT Tribal Council had unanimously referred the Water Ordinance to the voters.

Federal legislation to permit leasing, not selling, a portion of CRIT’s Colorado River federal entitlement off reservation could provide Arizona with additional drought relief The legislation would authorize the CRIT to lease a portion of its Arizona allocation for off-reservation use within Arizona. The water to be made available for lease will be measured by previous consumptive use by CRIT.

Prior to a bill being introduced in Congress, the state of Arizona will be seeking public input.

Virtual public hearings will be held in early December so that tribal members as well as water stakeholders in Arizona can learn more about the proposed legislation to authorize CRIT to lease its water off the reservation and to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to approve such leases.

Last year a tribal referendum gave the Tribal Council a clear mandate to seek federal legislation to authorize CRIT to lease part of its entitlement of water for off-reservation use. CRIT looks forward to having the same rights regarding its federal water allocation as other tribes in Arizona and throughout the western United States.

CRIT Chairman Dennis Patch said, “CRIT is one of the few entities that has real water at its disposal, not water that exists only on paper. We take that role seriously as we consider agreements that provide drought relief for Arizona, and provide economic benefits for the people of CRIT while at the same time preserving the life of the Colorado River.”

Vice Chairman Keith Moses said, “This is going to be a very public process with public meetings and comments in Arizona before there are hearings in Washington, DC and that’s critical because the more the public understands this legislation, the more they will support it.”

CRIT is currently making 50,000 acre-feet of water available a year for three years as system conservation to prop up the elevations in Lake Mead under an agreement and funding from the State of Arizona and NGO and corporate funders. In total, by the end of 2022 CRIT will have contributed enough water to Lake Mead to raise the elevation by almost three feet helping to prevent shortages. 

CRIT has the first priority decreed water right to divert 662,402 acre-feet per year to serve lands in Arizona. This first-priority right is not likely to be cut during shortages and will be a valuable addition to the water available to the State of Arizona.

Vice Chairman Keith Moses said, “This is going to be a very public process with public meetings and comments in Arizona before there are hearings in Washington, DC and that’s critical because the more the public understands this legislation, the more they will support it.”

CRIT is currently making 50,000 acre-feet of water available a year for three years as system conservation to prop up the elevations in Lake Mead under an agreement and funding from the State of Arizona and NGO and corporate funders. In total, by the end of 2022 CRIT will have contributed enough water to Lake Mead to raise the elevation by almost three feet helping to prevent shortages.

CRIT has the first priority decreed water right to divert 662,402 acre-feet per year to serve lands in Arizona. This first-priority right is not likely to be cut during shortages and will be a valuable addition to the water available to the State of Arizona. 

About the Colorado River Indian Tribes:

The Colorado River Indian Tribes include four distinct Tribes - the Mohave, Chemehuevi, Hopi, and Navajo. There are currently about 4,434 Tribal members. The CRIT Reservation was created in 1865 by the Federal Government for “Indians of the Colorado River and its tributaries,” originally for the Mohave and Chemehuevi, who had inhabited the area for centuries. People of the Hopi and Navajo Tribes were relocated to the reservation in later years. The reservation stretches along the Colorado River on both the Arizona and California side. It includes approximately 300,000 acres of land, with the river serving as the focal point and lifeblood of the area.




COLORADO RIVER INDIAN TRIBES

      Department of Health and Social Services

We are strongly urging all individuals to limit contact outside your immediate household as much as possible and to wear a face mask when you must be outside of your home. 

The Department of Health and Social Services will work in conjunction with Parker Indian Health Center to identify and notify any contacts the individuals may have had recently.  If you have any symptoms such as fever, shortness of breath, cough, sore throat, headache, myalgias (body aches), chills, repeating shaking with chills, and new loss of taste or smell, please contact the Parker Indian Health Center or your primary physician.

All residents on CRIT reservation are reminded to follow the CRIT Safer at Home Resolution, along with the Reservation wide face mask requirement, in order to protect themselves and their households.  Everyone is also reminded to stay at home except for essential tasks and limit contact with anyone who is not a member of your immediate household.

CRIT Reservation Wide Face Mask Requirement still remains in effect, requiring all individuals, businesses and patrons on CRIT reservation to wear a face mask when in public.  Face masks are MANDATORY for all CRIT Employees and any persons conducting business at the CRIT Tribal Office Complex.

  The best ways to protect yourself are to take certain precautions including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.  If soap and water is unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

  •  Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Wear a face mask when you must leave your home to conduct essential tasks.

  • Avoid close contact with anyone outside of your immediate household.

  • Stay home when you are sick.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces. Cover your cough or sneezes with a tissue and immediately discard the tissue in the trash.





Congratulations to Audriana Mitchell 2019-2020 Miss Indian Arizona


Photo courtesy of Miss Indian Arizona Association

CRIT Royalty 2019-2020, L-R, Marilyn Lomayesva, Junior Miss; Nokomis Stone, Miss CRIT; Winter Harper, Little Miss


Photo courtesy of CRIT Royalty Pageant


CRIT Chairman Dennis Patch comments on the System Conservation Agreement with the State of Arizona
August 16, 2019




Colorado River Indian Tribes Assumes Major Role In Drought Relief Efforts In Arizona and Western U.S.
August 7, 2019

(PHOENIX) The Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT) has been recognized by the Central Arizona Project for signing the System Conservation Agreement with the State of Arizona and its crucial role in drought relief. This took place during the August first Central Arizona Water Conservation District (CAP) regular meeting in Phoenix.

 
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